NHH students still among the country’s most satisfied

Stine Stoplestad som sitter på en benk med PC. Rektor Øystein Thøgersen i en forelesningssal.
The Study Barometer shows that NHH students overall are satisfied, but many are lonely and miss normal social life. ‘Both 2020 and 2021 have been and are marked by uncertainty, and we are therefore endeavouring to organise open and digital events and measures for all students at NHH,’ says leader of the student association NHHS Stine Stolpestad (to the left). To the right NHH Rector Øystein Thøgersen. Photo: Helge Skodvin
NHH By Ingrid Aarseth Johannessen

18 February 2021 16:20

NHH students still among the country’s most satisfied

Overall, NHH students are satisfied with their studies, but are missing their social life, according to the latest Study Barometer.

On 11 February, NOKUT launched the national questionnaire survey, the Study Barometer 2020, on assignment for the Ministry of Education and Research. It shows that NHH students are among the most satisfied in Norway in 2020. This year, the Study Barometer focuses on how the students experience everyday life as students and their social life during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The bachelor’s degree students rate their overall satisfaction with their study programme at 4.3 out of a possible five points. That is 0.3 points above the national average and a marginal decrease of 0.1 points compared to last year.

Read the report (in Norwegian)

The master’s degree students on the Economics and Business Administration programme rate their overall satisfaction at 4.2 points. That is 0.2 points above the national average and a decrease of 0.3 points compared to last year. Overall satisfaction measures how satisfied the students are with their study programme.

‘We're happy to see that our students are among the most satisfied students in Norway, also during a taxing pandemic. At the same time, we note that more students feel lonely and miss normal social life after the lockdown started on 12 March. We must take this very seriously. We will continue to work closely with the student association to promote student satisfaction and a good dialogue and ensure that the students’ needs are met,’ says Rector Øystein Thøgersen.

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MATCHED MORE THAN 60 PAIRS OF FRIENDS

Student and leader of the student association NHHS Stine Stolpestad (22) says that the COVID-19 pandemic has been hard for many students. She is herself a third-year student in Economics and Business Administration.

‘It has certainly not been easy. We have a very active student life here at NHH, and it’s hard when many of those social activities are taken from us. We have more first-year students than ever, and it’s important that both NHH and NHHS ensure that they get a good start to their studies, by taking into consideration that the students spend a lot of time on their own and don’t have as many people as usual to lean on academically,’ she says.

Stolpestad says that NHHS has taken several measures to contribute to better student welfare during the pandemic. This autumn, NHHS launched ‘NHHS blir kjent’ (NHHS get to know each other) which matched more than 60 pairs of friends. It’s a scheme that matches students with similar interests. ‘Corona Help NHHS’ was also launched whereby students do shopping and help fellow students who are in quarantine and isolation.

In 2021, the student association will focus especially on inclusion and activities as well as strengthening the psychosocial environment. Among other things, they organise digital gaming nights and quizzes.

‘Both 2020 and 2021 have been and are marked by uncertainty, and we are therefore endeavouring to organise open and digital events and measures for all students at NHH. We want to organise activities and open events for all members of the student association, so that the students have an opportunity to socialise and get involved,’ says Stoplestad. 

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NHH STANDS OUT IN TERMS OF JOB RELEVANCE

In the survey, NHH stands out on several questions relating to working life. NHH scores 1.6 points more than the national average on questions about whether the private sector contributes to the teaching of the bachelor's students. The master’s students rate NHH 1.3 points above the national average.

NHH is rated 0.8 points higher than the national average when master's students are asked whether they have opportunities to work on projects in cooperation with business and industry. Furthermore, NHH scores 0.6 points above the national average in relation to whether bachelor’s degree students are given an introduction to how they should their communicate competence to potential employers.

‘It’s important to NHH that the students come into contact with the business sector at an early stage and are familiar with what their competence can be used for. The private sector is constantly changing and what expertise is needed changes quickly. We therefore work continuously to ensure that the education we offer remains relevant to employers. Among other things, we offer credit-bearing internships with leading international companies and invite recognised businesspersons to give guest lectures,’ says Thøgersen.

ABOUT THE SAME AMOUNT OF TIME SPENT ON STUDIES

The survey shows that NHH students are more satisfied than the national average with the use of digital tools. The bachelor’s students awarded 4.1 points when asked whether they feel that the use of digital learning platforms works well in their study programme. That is 0.7 points above the national average. The master’s students gave a score of 3.8 points.

The bachelor’s students awarded a score of 3.8 points when asked whether they are given training in the use of digital programmes that are relevant to their field of study. That is 0.8 points above the national average.

Furthermore, the Study Barometer shows that, nationally, students spend approximately as much time studying as in earlier years, but a little less time on organised teaching activities and more time on self-study. Minister of Research and Higher Education Henrik Asheim says in a press release that he is happy to note that the majority of students believe they will complete their studies.

‘It’s been really tough for many students, so I have no problem understanding that it's difficult to remain motivated. I’m therefore very pleased that the majority of the students believe they will complete their degree as planned,’ says Asheim.