Regulations for examinations at NHH (full-time programmes)

Regulations for examinations at NHH (full-time programmes)

Adopted by the Executive Board of the NHH on 10 June 2004. Changes adopted by the Executive Board on 8 December 2005, 8 February 2007, 11 June 2009, 10 December 2012, 17 December 2013, 19 June 2014 and 27 October 2017 pursuant to the provisions of the Act relating to Universities and Colleges of 1 April 2005, § 3-3, § 3-9, § 3-10, § 8-2.

Supplementary regulations to these regulations

Section 1. Scope and extent

The regulations apply to all persons taking examinations at NHH, full-time programmes, including PhD students and persons passing the exams for translator accreditation, as long as the conditions are not regulated in separate regulations.

Section 2. Definitions

Student: A person accepted into a programme at NHH, cf. the Act relating to Universities and Colleges, sections 3-6 - 3-7 or given access to courses as a guest student in accordance with agreements between NHH and other institutions.

Non-enrolled student: A person who takes an examination in accordance with the provisions of the Act relating to Universities and Colleges, section 3-10

Curriculum: A plan of the educational content of a programme.

Course: The smallest unit that can be included in a programme. All courses must have a scope indicated by points (course credits).

Examination: Test of the extent of a student's knowledge and skills, in which a grade is given that is shown on a diploma or becomes part of the basis for calculation of a grade on a diploma.

Part examination: Test that gives a separate grade, or in which the grade may form part of the calculation of a final grade.

Course credits: Measure of work load. A full academic year consists of 60 course credits, in accordance with the European ECTS-system.

Section 3. Conditions for admittance to an examination

1) The right to participate in an examination precludes the following:

i. valid right to a programme of which the examination forms part, or admittance to the examination as a non-enrolled student, cf. Section 19.

ii. paid semester fee, and registration for the examination within the set deadlines, cf. Section 4. Students who are exempt from payment of the semester fee must register within the same deadlines to be granted access to the examination.

iii. satisfaction of any requirements for course approval, based on mandatory attendance/approved work or similar, in accordance with the curriculum or course description.

2) The programme boards may provide supplementary regulations that certain examinations cannot be sat before other examinations or subjects have been passed/approved. Information about this will be found in the curriculum or course description for the relevant course.

Section 4. Registration

1) Students register for the examination using StudentWeb, or in exceptional circumstances by written application.

2) The deadline for registration for examinations is 1 February in the spring semester and 1 September in the autumn semester. In special circumstances dispensation from the deadline for registration to the examination may be granted, cf. also section 12.

Section 5. Forms of Assessment

1) The knowledge and skills of the students must be tested in an impartial and professionally adequate manner.

2) The following forms of assessment may be used:

School-based examinations: Written or oral tests held in premises determined by the institution and under the supervision of persons appointed by the institution.

Home examinations: Tasks that must be completed within a determined period of time. The regulations governing home examinations can be found in the supplementary regulations to the Regulations for examinations at NHH (full-time programmes).

Portfolio assessment: Assessment of assignments submitted during the time that the relevant subject is studied, and that enter into a portfolio. Further regulations are provided in the curriculum.

Thesis: Comprehensive written work, prepared under guidance.

Other forms of assessment, e.g. term papers, casework, project-related tasks or similar, in accordance with detailed provisions in the curriculum.

3) School-based examinations are always individual tests. The other forms of assessment can be carried out on group or individual basis, in accordance with the curriculum / course description for the course in question.

4) The curriculum for each programme shall state the form of assessment to be used in the various courses. The form of assessment may consist of one or more elements. If the form of assessment is made up of multiple elements, the percentage distribution of the grade total must be stated.

Section 6. Examination semesters

1) Information about which semester the examination in each course is held must be stated in the curriculum for each programme.

2) Written school-based examinations are held each semester for the Bachelor of Science programme in Economics and Business Administration. It is a precondition for access to academic examination in semesters where no classes will be given in a course, that any requirements for course approval in the form of approved/passed submitted exercises, part examinations or similar are met in the ordinary teaching semester.

3) In the Master of Science programme in Economics and Business Administration, the examination is only held in the teaching semester, unless special requirements for individual courses lead to another decision being made by the Master Programme Board.

4) In the Master programme in Accounting and Auditing (the professional module), the examination in each course is held once per academic year, in accordance with the curriculum.

5) The programme boards may in special cases make decisions on alternate times for examinations, and on requirements for access to these examinations.

6) In the case of significant change to the curriculum, the programme boards determine when the final course examinations shall be held. Students who do not pass the final ordinary course examination, and who have a valid right to study in the programme, may be granted access to extraordinary examinations, if so permitted by the programme board that governs the programme.

Section 7. Examination language

1) Examination questions are written in Norwegian, or in other languages, in accordance with the curriculum. At PhD level, the examination language is English, unless otherwise specifically determined.

2) If examination questions are set in Norwegian, it should normally be set in both of the Norwegian official languages, unless all of the candidates have chosen the same language in advance.

3) Unless otherwise decided, the examination may be answered in Norwegian, another Scandinavian language or English. The programme boards can determine that the examination answers for specific subjects must be submitted in another language than Norwegian. Information about this must be contained in the curriculum, or in the course description.

Section 8 Execution of written school-based examinations under supervision

  1. It is the candidate's own responsibility to ensure that he/she knows the time and place of the examination.
  2. Candidates must be in the examination hall no later than 30 minutes before the start of the examination. Late attendance may lead to expulsion from the examination. The Office of Student and Academic Affairs decides whether candidates who arrive late may sit the examination.
  3. Guidelines for the use of aids during examinations are shown in the supplementary regulations to these regulations. Examination aids violating these guidelines may not be used during examinations.
  4. Candidates must bring their student identity cards or other approved proof of identity on all examination days.
  5. The candidate must find a vacant desk in the specified area. The candidate may only bring food, drinks and permitted examination aids to the desk. Outer clothes, bags, notes and similar must be stored at the designated place. Mobile telephones, watches and other electronic equipment must be turned off and packed away.
  6. Candidates are not permitted to leave the examination hall until one hour after the examination papers have been distributed.
  7. After a candidate has signed in, he or she may only leave the examination hall with permission from, and accompanied by, an invigilator.
  8. Only the approved examination answer paper distributed in the examination hall may be used.
  9. There must be peace and quiet in the examination hall so that the candidates are not disturbed. Candidates who fail to adhere to this may be expelled from the examination hall.
  10. Candidates may work on the examination within the defined examination period.
  11. It is the responsibility of the candidate to ensure that the submitted papers are complete.

Supplementary regulations to section 8

Section 9. Execution of home examinations and other written work that are included in the form of assessment, or which form the basis for course approval

1) Thesis, term papers and other written work that are included in the form of assessment, or which form the basis for course approval may not quote from the candidate's own work used in other contexts, or others', work without marking the parts of the text which are quotes and stating the source.

2) All sources must be stated in a reference list attached to the work.

3) Detailed rules may be drawn up for use of sources and references in connection with the independent work in the Master of Science programme.

4) Thesis, term papers and other written work that are included in the form of assessment, or which form the basis for course approval may not have been used previously as part of other courses at the NHH or other institutions.

5) In relation to individual home examinations and other individual written work that are included in the form of assessment, or which form the basis for course approval, collaboration with other persons regarding the answer paper is not permitted. The answer paper should constitute the candidate's independent work.

6) In relation to group home examinations and other group-based written work that are included in the form of assessment, or which form the basis for course approval, collaboration with other groups regarding the answer paper is not permitted. The answer paper should constitute the group's independent work. All the members of the group are responsible for the answer paper in its entirety. All candidates whose name/candidate number is written on the anser paper should have participated in the group work and made a fair contribution to the answer paper.

7) The programme boards create general rule sets for the design and execution of home examinations, term projects and thesis. These can be found in the supplementary regulations to these regulations.

Supplementary regulations to section 9

Section 10. Cheating

1) Possession of aids violating these regulations or the document "Supplementary regulations to the regulations for examinations at NHH (full-time programmes)" will be regarded as attempt to cheat or as cheating. If students have prohibited aids at their disposition after the examination papers have been distributed, it will be regarded as cheating.

2) Breach of the regulations contained in section 8 of these regulations will be regarded as attempt to cheat or cheating.

3) Communication with other persons during a school-based examination regarding the content of the answer paper will be regarded as attempt to cheat or as cheating. Exempt from this is contact with the department's contact person in case of need for clarification of the questions or suspicion of errors in the questions.

4) Breach of the regulations concerning collaboration and use of sources that appear in section 9 of these regulations, as well as the supplementary regulations to these regulations, will be regarded as attempt to cheat or cheating.

5) NHH treats attempt to cheat in accordance with the provisions of the Act relating to Universities and Colleges, sections 4-7 and 4-8. Attempt to cheat can lead to annulment of examination results and exclusion from the institution and other institutions pertaining to the same law for up to one year.

Supplementary regulations to section 10

Section 11. Special examination arrangements

1) A student with disabilities, and who for this reason has problems taking an examination in the usual way, may apply for an adapted examination. Adaptations are intended to compensate for the disadvantages caused by the disability, while at the same time ensuring as far as possible that the students are tested in the same way. Applications must be sent to the Office of Academic and Student Affairs on the appropriate form.

2) Special conditions may include:

  • Extended examination time
  • Opportunity for longer breaks, if necessary with the opportunity to rest
  • Separate examination hall with separate guards
  • Use of PCs and other technical aids
  • Writing assistance, sign language interpreter and other practical assistance
  • Transfer of questions to Braille or large type
  • Reading aloud of question papers and/or answer papers
  • Alternative forms of assessment

3) Students who suffer from dyscalculia, dyslexia or other difficulty in reading and writing can, if so desired, attach to their answers an anonymiszed form from the examination office, or an anonymiszed certificate from a speech therapist or another specialist who can confirm this.

4) The deadline for application for special conditions is 1 February in the spring semester and 1 September in the autumn semester. If special conditions make necessary, the Office of Academic and Student Affairs can deviate from this deadline. The need for special conditions must be documented by a medical certificate, or certificate from another specialist. Students who suffer from dyscalculia, dyslexia or other reading and writing difficulty must have a recent relevant certificate from a speech therapist or other specialist that describes which special conditions are necessary.

Section 12. Withdrawal from examination. Absence.

1) A student who wishes to withdraw from the examination must do so in writing or via StudentWeb at the latest three weeks before the date of the examination/submission of home examination. Withdrawal before this deadline will not apply as an attempted examination.

2) Students who fall ill between the withdrawal deadline and the day of examination, or who due to this or by reason of force majeure are not able to sit the examination, must submit documentation of this at the latest on the first working day subsequent to the examination if the application to sit is not to apply as an attempt to take the examination. The documentation must specify which examination(s) the absence applies for.

3) A student who aborts the examination after it has begun must notify the guard in writing. Abort during the examination is regarded as failure, unless the student, on the next working day at the latest, submits a medical certificate that documents illness on the day of the examination. A student is regarded as having failed if he or she leaves the examination hall without having handed in an answer paper.

4) A student who does not attend the examination at the determined time without valid reason for absence, and who has not withdrawn from the examination, cf. point 1, is registered as "not attended". "Not attended" is regarded as an attempt to sit the examination.

5) Once an answer paper has been submitted, the student cannot avoid the paper being graded.

Section 13. Deferred examinations

Deferred examinations will not normally be arranged in the case of absence. In particular cases, such as in the case of illness or force majeure, following application to the Office of Academic and Student Affairs, a deferred examination may be held for major examinations in the course of study. When processing an application for a deferred examination, the significance of absence from the planned examination in relation to the individual's study progress is assessed. In the case of an application concerning a deferred examination, a medical certificate must have been submitted at the latest on the first working day following the aborted examination or at the latest the first working day following the first day of examination that the student does not attend.

Section 14. Examination attempts. Repeat examination

1)
a) A student in the Bachelor programme may sit examinations at NHH in the same subject a maximum of two times, provided that examinations in the subject are held. As a transitional arrangement, students who already have an examination attempt in a subject from the Spring semester 2009 or an earlier semester, will have three ordinary attempts in the subject.

b) A student in the Master programmes may sit examinations at NHH in the same subject a maximum of three times, provided that examinations in the subject are held. Excepted from this regulation are students in the Master programme in Accounting and Auditing who have not obtained the minimum grade required by the Financial Supervisory Authority of Norway (Finanstilsynet (former known as Kredittilsynet)) for the authorization of state authorized auditor.

2) Following a written application to the Student and Academic Affairs’ Office, a student who has not obtained a passing grade after the ordinary attempts, cf. 1, may be granted a further one attempt.
Applications for extra attempts at an examination are processed in accordance with the following guidelines:

a) In order to be granted an extra attempt, serious reasons must be present, and these must, in principle, be documented. Students' progression of studies and how far they have come in their studies will also be considered while processing the application.

b) An extra attempt will not be granted if a pass grade in the subject has been achieved.

c) An extra attempt will normally not be granted after "not attended" on both/all previous attempts, unless there is a reason in accordance with a).

d) Further attempts will normally not be allowed.

e) Repeated medical certificates for the extra attempt may lead to time-limited access to this attempt.

f) When all attempts have been made without a passing grade, the right of study might be terminated.

3) When examinations are repeated, the syllabus, requirements for course approval and form of assessment that are determined for the course at the time of sitting apply.

4) If a candidate has passed the same examination more than once, the best grade will apply.

5) For the optional language courses in the Bachelor of Science programme in Economics and Business Administration, repetition of the examination in the introductory module in parallel with, or after the examination in the further modules in the same language subject is not permitted.

Section 15. The grading system

1) In accordance with the Act relating to Universities and Colleges, section 3-9, grades are set using
a) letter grades from A – F, in which A is the best passing grade and E the lowest passing grade, and F indicates failure.
b) passed/failed.

2) The programme boards decide which examinations shall use passed/failed and which examinations shall use letter grades.

3) The letter grades are equivalent to the following numerical values: A=5, B=4, C=3, D=2, E=1. The numerical values are used when calculating multiple examination results to be included in a total mean grade for a subject, and in the case of ranking applicants for higher degree studies.

4) If the form of assessment consists of several elements, all elements must be passed before the course as a whole is regarded as passed. In the case of courses in which multiple elements are included in the form of assessment and these are regarded as separate units, the sub-grades are stated on transcripts/diplomas for the various elements, while the subject as a whole is recorded as pass.

The following qualitative descriptions apply to the grade system:

A Excellent. An excellent performance, clearly outstanding. The candidate demonstrates excellent judgement and a high degree of independent thinking.

B Very good. A very good performance. The candidate demonstrates sound judgement and a very good degree of independent thinking.

C Good. A good performance in most areas. The candidate demonstrates a reasonable degree of judgement and independent thinking in the most important areas.

D Satisfactory. A satisfactory performance, but with significant shortcomings. The candidate demonstrates a limited degree of judgement and independent thinking.

E Sufficient. A performance that meets the minimum criteria, but no more. The candidate demonstrates a very limited degree of judgement and independent thinking.

F Fail. A performance that does not meet the minimum academic criteria. The candidate demonstrates an absence of both judgement and independent thinking.

Section 16. Grading

1) Appointment of examiners is made by the relevant department.

2) Grades should be published within three weeks, unless a deferred deadline has been given on the basis of a temporary regulation fixed by the Executive Board of the NHH, cf. the Act relating to Universities and Colleges, section 3-9. This applies to all forms of assessment, exept for the master thesis, where the deadline for publishing the grade is six weeks.

3) Examination results are published on StudentWeb.

Section 17 Right to explanation

1) A candidate has the right to receive an explanation of the grade given, in accordance with the Act relating to Universities and Colleges, section 5-3 and the Public Administration Act, sections 24 and 25.

2) A demand for explanation of the grade given for a written examination must be submitted at the latest one week following the grade being published. Demand for explanation of grades given for oral examinations must be submitted immediately following the candidate being informed of the grade.

3) Explanations are given orally or in writing, as decided by the examiners. The explanation should normally be provided within two weeks of the candidate requesting it. The explanation shall provide a description of the general principles that form the basis of the grade and for assessment of the candidate's achievement. If written guidelines for the assessment are provided, these must be available to the candidates after the grade has been awarded.

Section 18. Appeals against the result of the examination

1) There is a right to appeal grades awarded that, by their nature, are possible to re-examine. Grades awarded in oral examinations may not be appealed.

2) Appeals against grades awarded must be submitted within three weeks of the grades being published. If explanation of the grade has been demanded, there is a three week deadline from the time that the candidate receives the explanation. All appeals must be submitted in writing, and should preferably be justified. The appeal must be sent to the Office of Academic and Student Affairs.

3) In the case of continual assessment, the right to appeal comes into force when the final grade is given, unless otherwise stated in the curriculum. Assessments that only are feedback during the teaching process from a teacher/tutor, and that do not result in a grade being awarded, may not be appealed.

4) In the case of an appeal, the candidate's answers will be submitted to a new examination commission which will reassess the entire examination. The answers are normally sent to a new examination commission six weeks after the grades being published. Award of grades may be in the favour or disfavour of the complainant. Grades awarded following remarking are final and cannot be appealed.

5) In the case of appeal against grades awarded for group work, in which a common grade is awarded, all of the students must agree and sign the appeal.

Section 19. Non-enrolled students

1) Non-enrolled students are given access to individual subjects if they satisfy the admission requirements for the programme that the subjects are part of. Access to subjects is given for one semester at a time. After the semester in question the right to attend ceases. The right to attend lectures / sit an examination may, following close consideration, be renewed by the Office of Academic and Student Affairs. The programme boards can in particular cases make exemptions to the subject requirements that apply to ordinary admission to the programme.

2) The rights of non-enrolled students at the school are limited to access to participate in public lectures and access to sit examinations in accordance with the Act relating to Universities and Colleges. By lecture, we mean the communication of knowledge to a collected student group on the course, and in which the participants own activity is, as a rule, limited to individual questions and comments. Non-enrolled students do not have access to the school's computer rooms, or the right to creation of an IT account.

3) Non-enrolled students can be refused admission to examinations, if the curriculum or subject plan has set the requirement for mandatory teaching, practice, essay submission, etc., when these in themselves provide a significant level of skills that are part of the aim of the education, and these skills cannot be tested in an ordinary examination.

4) Non-enrolled students must pay semester fees to the Bergen Student's Union (SiB), and will be issued with a semester card that shows that the fees have been paid. The Executive Board of the NHH may also determine that non-enrolled students must pay examination fees, cf. section 3-10 of the Act relating to Universities and Colleges.

5) Non-enrolled students may apply for admission to subjects within decided deadlines, and must register for examination within the normal deadlines for registration. The Office of Academic and Student Affairs may, in special circumstances, issue dispensation from application time limits.

6) These regulations also apply for non-enrolled students as long as the provisions do not conflict with the content of this section.

7) This section does not apply for non-enrolled students at doctorate level.

Section 20. Supplementary regulations

Supplementary regulations may be provided within the framework of these regulations.

Section 21. Validity

The regulations came into force on 9 August 2004.