Marketing Topics: Contemporary Research Perspectives in Consumer Psychology

MAR527NFB Marketing Topics: Contemporary Research Perspectives in Consumer Psychology

  • Topics

    Topics

    Judgment, Decision Making, and Attitude Measurement, Change and Persuasion

     

     

  • Learning outcome

    Learning outcome

    This course will focus on ways to approach the study of various aspects of consumer behavior with contemporary theories and methods in consumer and social psychological research.

    The course will give students Insight into

    1. different research approaches to knowledge creation in psychology and consumer behavior

    2. experiential and hedonic issues in consumer research

    3. factors influencing judgment and choice

    4. metacognitive processes in attitude change and judgment

    5. the roles of explicit and implicit

     

    Participants will discuss and defend their perspectives by drawing on the set of assigned readings as well as other resources.

    Knowledge - The candidate...

    -will get a good and up-dated insight into important research approaches in consumer psychology/consumer behavior.

     

    Competence - The candidate...

    - will be able to contribute to knowledge creation in consumer psychology and consumer behavior.

  • Teaching

    Teaching

    Students must be prepared to present summaries and engage in class discussions.

  • Required prerequisites

    Required prerequisites

     

  • Assessment

    Assessment

    Participants in the seminar will write one brief paper for each session. Course grade is based on two short or one long essays.

  • Grading Scale

    Grading Scale

    Grades: A-F

  • Computer tools

    Computer tools

    None.

  • Semester

    Semester

    Spring 2013

     

    Intensive April 29-May 3

    9.15 - 16, room MN444

  • Literature

    Literature

    A list of readings is available

Overview

ECTS Credits
5
Teaching language
English.
Semester
Spring

Course responsible

Curtis P. Haugtvedt, Department of Marketing and Logistics/Department of Psychology, Ohio State University